est. 1797
224 YEARS
OF
CONTINUOUS PUBLICATION
      

Hagerstown Town & Country Almanack

T
he Hagerstown Town and Country Almanack was established in 1797, making it the second oldest almanac in the United States. It began in a modest print shop on South Potomac Street in Hagerstown, Maryland and was the creation of colonial printer John Gruber and his partner and son-in-law Daniel May. Gruber is considered by many to be one of Hagerstown's "favorite sons" right along with Jonathan Hager, the town's founder and namesake. Gruber's almanac has been published continuously for 225 years and is the ONLY almanac that is still published today by direct descendants of its founder.

The Almanack, as it soon became known, grew in popularity, quickly becoming an integral part of everyday Early American life. For many years hence, it was THE primary source for agricultural, meteorological and astronomical information vital to an agrarian community's survival. The highly accurate weather forecasts (made over 16 months in advance) were first derived using centuries-old methods but over the years, the method has been advanced, incorporating newer, more reliable techniques. And it still contains favorite folk remedies, useful hints and tips for everyday living, and other forms of traditional community wisdoms. Millions of copies have been sold and it has been said that the The Almanack has made Hagerstown widely-known throughout the U.S. and has given Maryland an ‘epicenter’ of farming and agricultural life.

Throughout its long history, The Almanack has been recognized countless times for its contributions to the steady development and success of colonial agrarian society (see Maryland Traditions' 2012 ALTA Award for Tradition  as well as for making a significant contribution to our national pride (see Hagerstown Celebrates Star Spangled Banner's 200th Anniversary!). 

Gruber's Hagerstown Town and Country Almanack Company has been recognized by Wikipedia as the 47th oldest company in the United  States.  Click here to see the full list.

 The Almanack Partners with PennState Extension! 

The Gruber Almanack, LLC is excited to announce that its Hagerstown Town and Country Almanack has partnered with PennState Extension of Franklin County, Pennsylvania!  The Extension is a modern educational organization, dedicated to delivering science-based information to people, businesses, and communities to help address problems and help to implement innovative techniques in farming, agricultural, and dairy to improve efficiencies and yields. For the full press release, click here.  To review Extension topics, click here 

 April Almanack Weather Update is Here! 

Almanack Weather Prognosticator, Chad Merrill, will be reviewing the coming 'April Showers' in his monthy column in The Cumberland Times-News, that focuses on the western Maryland region.  Click here to review his April column.


The Hagerstown Almanack Announces 'Our Followers Video' Forum! 

The Hagerstown Town and Country Almanack announces a new content section, Our Followers Video, on its YouTube channel. Followers can now submit videos/blog links on a wide variety of topics. Click here for the press release and details on type of content desired and how to submit.

The Baltimore Sun Features John Gruber's Hagerstown Almanack!

The Hagerstown Town and Country Almanack is featured on the front page of The Baltimore Sun's Sunday, December 13, 2020 edition!  Staff writer, Jonathan Pitts, speaks with Charles W. Fisher, Jr., Editor and direct decendant of The Almanack's founder, John Gruber,  Jerry Spessard, Business and Sales Manager, Chad Merrill, Almanack Weather Prognosticator/Meteorologist, and Bill O'Toole, Weather Prognisticator Emeritus, about its 225-year history, surving in a digital, online age, and what we can expect in the way of winter weather coming this year and next.  Click here and check out  The Sun's really nice and easy-to-access on line, digital e-newspaper. 





                                                             For  more HAGERSTOWN ALMANACK NEWS, click here