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MID-ATLANTIC WEATHER WATCH FOR FEBRUARY

Snow (1); fair and cold (2,3,4).  Snow, mainly in the southern part of the region (5,6,7) turning fair and cold (8,9,10,11,12,13). Light snow mainly in the north (14,15) with fair and milder weather (16,17.  Showers in the south (18,19) with colder temperatures and lake-effect snow (20,21).  Windy, cold (22,23) with a Nor’easter bringing heavy snow (24,25,26) turning fair but quite cold (27,28).

MONTHLY GARDEN ACTIVITIES


BEST DAYS FOR FARM ACTIVITIES 

                                                       


THOUGHT FOR TODAY'S 

LIVING  

    

"You only reap what you sow, so be sure to spread more kindness and 
 consideration for your fellow man than envy or ill will” 
                                                                                      John Gruber  (1768-1857) 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE...............

NEWS  NEWS  NEWS       

HAGERSTOWN TOWN  AND  COUNTRY ALMANACK 

CONTACT:  Gerald W. Spessard, Business/Sales Manager  TELEPHONE: (301) 491-4002 (Cell)  (717) 294-6086

                              "You can fool some of the people all of the time, and all 
                          of the people some of the time, but you can not fool all 
                          of the people all of the time” 

                                                                                    Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865)
MID-ATLANTIC WEATHER WATCH: Snow (1); fair and cold (2,3,4).  Snow, mainly in the southern part of the region (5,6,7) turning fair and cold (8,9,10,11,12,13). Light snow mainly in the north (14,15) with fair and milder weather (16,17.  Showers in the south (18,19) with colder temperatures and lake-effect snow (20,21).  Windy, cold (22,23) with a Nor’easter bringing heavy snow (24,25,26) turning fair but quite cold (27,28).

TORNADO WATCH: The Hagerstown Town and Country Almanack sees no tornado activity in the Mid-Atlantic Region in the month of February.

FULL MOON: In 2019, February’s FULL MOON will occur on Monday, the 21st. In many certain parts of North America, Native Americans suffered very harsh winters and saw the deepest snow during this month. They called it SNOW MOON and because there was such an extreme scarcity of game to hunt, it was also aptly called HUNGER MOON. 

SPECIAL NOTES: Watch out for "Punxsutawney Phil” as he makes his much-anticipated appearance on Saturday, February 2nd to ‘predict’ the coming of Spring.  It will be determined by this little marmota monax’s reaction to the day’s weather.  If it is sunny and he sees his shadow, he will retreat underground for another 6 weeks of Winter! If it is cloudy and he doesn’t get scared by his own shadow, Spring will come early in 2019. 

HOLIDAYS: Celebrate the Christian Festival of Lights, or Candlemas, on Saturday, February 2nd It is on this day that many churches traditionally light more candles than usual during their daily services. The additional light not only made the day special but it was also believed that the additional light would provide protection from illness and plague in the coming year. Valentine’s Day, February 14th, falls on Thursday in 2019. Show that special someone just how much you appreciate their being a part of your life. The birthdays of Abraham Lincoln (Tuesday, February 12th) and George Washington (Friday, the 22nd) are collectively celebrated on President’s Day which falls on Monday, February 18th to provide us with an extended holiday weekend. Enjoy!

THE GARDEN: With some good news from our friend "Punxsutawney Phil”, we can start thinking about things to do in an early Spring. Mid- to late-February is the time to fertilize shrubs and evergreens. Use an acid-type Rhododendron fertilizer to feed evergreens, conifers, broad leaf evergreens, Rhododendrons, Azaleas, and Camellias. Use an all-purpose fertilizer to feed Roses and other deciduous trees and shrubs. If you use granular type fertilizers, be sure to water it in thoroughly.  It's a good time to stroll around and trim back any branches that were damaged by the ravages of Winter. If you haven't yet applied your dormant spray to your fruit trees, DO IT NOW!! Stored summer flowering bulbs may try to start into growth if they are subjected to heat. They should be kept very dry, and stored at 45° F. If they are shriveling, put them into slightly damp peat moss, but keep them cool!  Your house plants may notice the longer days and begin growing. You can begin feeding them again. 

J. GRUBER’S THOUGHT FOR TODAY’S LIVING 

"You only reap what you sow, so be sure to spread more kindness and consideration for your fellow man than envy or ill will”
    
                                             
             
                                                                                For more ALMANACK NEWS, click here