AS A
'FRIEND OF THE ALMANACK'
YOU CAN SAVE $$$!
WHAT
'FRIENDS OF THE ALMANACK'
GET
MID-ATLANTIC WEATHER WATCH FOR AUGUST

STORMS (1,2) with hazy, hot, and humid weather (3,4,5,6,7).  Hurricane from Gulf, heavy rain (8,9,10) turning fair and cooler (11,12,13,14).  Scattered showers (15,16); fair and very warm (17,18, 19) with off-shore hurricane, heavy rain, STORMS  in the east (20,21).  Fair and warm again (22,23,24) with showers (25,26,27,28). Off-shore hurricane, heavy rain, STORMS  (29,30,31.)  

     

GARDENING ACTIVITIES

FOR  AUGUST



A THOUGHT 
FOR TODAY'S LIVING 

"Great things are not accomplished by idle dreams but by years of patient study”
                                                                                                    John Gruber (1768--1857)


AUGUST GARDENING ACTIVITIES

S

ummer blooming shrubs should be pruned for shape after they have finished flowering. Remove any dead or diseased branches.

AUGUST LAWN CARE

Contrary to popular belief, a brown lawn isn't necessarily a dead lawn. Grasses go dormant in times of drought, but will quickly return to life with the fall rains. 

If a lush green lawn is important to you, and you don't mind mowing, water it regularly, and deeply. If a water shortage is expected, or you hate tending to grass, you may choose to just let your lawn go dormant, and water it as seldom as once a month. 

Raise the cutting height of the mower. Taller grass cools the roots and helps to keep the moisture in the soil longer. Schedule grass mowing in the morning or mid-day hours to avoid late afternoon thundershowers (and The Almanack does see some storms in August!).  

If the weather is cool, Fescue can be sown to repair lawns in the last week of August.  

Keep the weeds pulled, before they have a chance to flower and go to seed again. Otherwise, you will be fighting newly germinated weed seed for the next several years. Weeds in the garden are harmful because they rob your plants of water and nutrients, harbor insects and diseases, and, on occasion grow tall enough to shade your flowers and plants. Change the water in your bird bath regularly, and keep it filled. Standing water is less healthy for the birds, and may become a breeding ground for mosquito larvae. 

August is the peak of the hot and dry season and your plants will need water more than anything during this time.  If watering is limited or restricted in your area, concentrate on getting the most to newly planted trees and shrubs.  If you use thick mulch and give it a good soak, water will be retained much better over much longer periods of time. 

A TIME TO HARVEST AND A TIME TO BE CAREFUL

To ensure a happy harvest, pick vegetables in the morning hours when the sugar content is highest.  Never harvest or do any other garden work when plants are wet or you’re likely to spread disease.  

Be careful in the garden.  Bruised or scratched vegetables spoil quickly and damaged plants are targets for pests and diseases. Use clippers or a sharp knife to harvest tough- or brittle-stemmed crops such as broccoli, cabbage, eggplant, peppers, and squash. They can be damaged if pulled or torn from their stems.    

August is not too late to sow Portulaca (moss rose). They will bloom in about three weeks from seed. If you choose to water your lawn, do so only when wilted or discolored.  

Think about potting herbs you plan to move indoors for the winter.  Don’t move them in just yet but get them accustomed to their containers early. Rosemary, thyme, and tarragon are the best candidates for this. 

To encourage more flowers, azaleas should be trimmed after they bloom in the spring and before the end of August. 

Stop feeding trees and shrubs after mid-August.  You don’t want to promote new growth that will not have time to fully mature before winter sets in.