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MID-ATLANTIC WEATHER WATCH FOR SEPTEMBER

Periods of STORMS (1,2,3,4,5,6); fair and warm (7,8). Showers (9,10) with fair and mild temperatures (11,12,13). More showers (14,15) turning fair, warm, but a bit cooler (16,17,17,18,19,20,21,22,23,24,25). Even more showers (26,27,28); with fair and mild weather (29,30).

     

GARDENING ACTIVITIES

FOR  SEPTEMBER



A THOUGHT 
FOR TODAY'S LIVING 

         "The classroom is not the only place                where a person can learn"
                                                                                                    John Gruber (1768--1857)


SEPTEMBER GARDENING ACTIVITIES

F

all is a great time to plant and divide perennials and shrubs for next year's garden. By planting in the fall, your plants do not endure the stressful summer heat during establishment and have time to form sufficient root systems before the onset of winter dormancy. 

For the best flavor, pick green beans when they are still thinner than a pencil.  Pick lettuce when the outer leaves are four to six inches long. Pick tomatoes 5 to 8 days after color has fully developed.  Pick zucchini when it is five to eight inches long.

 Among the more animal-proof varieties include allium, daffodils, glory–of-the-snow, hyacinths, scilla, and snowdrops. 

 FALL LAWN CARE

September is one of the best months of the entire year for seeding and sodding new lawns.

If the lawn needs thatching, it can be done during the early fall.

When the fall rains arrive, fertilize your lawn with a slow-release 3-1-2 ration fertilizer

Over-seed old lawns with fresh seed to help fill in the bare spots and crowd out weeds and mosses.

Don't retire the lawn mower when the growth of your lawn slows down this fall. As long as the grass continues to grow, it should be mowed.

Don't allow leaves to accumulate on the lawn. Rake them up regularly, and store in a pile for use as mulch in your garden next summer. If leaves accumulate on your lawn and become matted down by rain, they may kill the grass.

You can help leaves break down more easily by running a lawn mower back and forth over the pile. Put the shredded leaves directly onto the garden or compost pile.

Plant cabbages, peas, fennel, cauliflower, lettuce, Swiss chard, onions, leeks, Chinese peas, and endive crops for late autumn harvest. Also, try beets, turnips, spinach, radishes, collards and broccoli but be sure to water them thoroughly after planting. Other fast-growing vegetables to consider are arugula and kale.

Make a long-range plan to gradually convert your current landscape to the one you  desire. Don't pull out any ornamental plantings until you have the time and resources to replace them.

Pot up chives, parsley, and other herbs, and bring into the house to extend the growing season.

Start taking cuttings of your annual plants to bring indoors and carry through the winter. Geranium, coleus, fuschia, and other plants do best when stem cuttings are rooted and kept in pots indoors through the winter. Be sure to place pots where they receive plenty of light.

Don’t forget to consider what your flower garden might need. Plant spring-flowering bulbs such as daffodils, hyacinths, and tulips 6 to 8 weeks before the first frost. 

Plant pansies quickly so they can develop reliable roots before soil gets too cold (Fall-planted pansies WILL survive winter!).

Bring summer vacationing houseplants back indoors while the windows are still open. Inspect every plant very closely for any hitchhiking pests!