AS A
'FRIEND OF THE ALMANACK'
YOU CAN SAVE $$$!
WHAT
'FRIENDS OF THE ALMANACK'
GET
MID-ATLANTIC WEATHER WATCH FOR FEBRUARY

Cold, periods of light snow (1,2,3,4,5) with Nor’easter and heavy snow (6,7,8). Fair, rather cold (9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16) remaining fair, but not as cold (17,18). Snow, some rain in the southern part of the region (19,20,21) turning fair, cold 22,23,24,25,26) with Nor’easter, heavy snow (27,28,29).

 

MONTHLY GARDEN ACTIVITIES


BEST DAYS FOR FARM ACTIVITIES 

                                                       


JOHN GRUBER'S THOUGHT FOR TODAY'S 

LIVING  


"If you don’t expect the impossible, you will never be disappointed                           
                                                                    John Gruber  (1768-1857) 

 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE...............

NEWS  NEWS  NEWS       

HAGERSTOWN TOWN  AND  COUNTRY ALMANACK 

BUY THE GENUINE  ACCEPT NO OTHER!

ALMANACK SEES COOLER FALL WEATHER FOR MID-ATLANTIC, NORTHEAST

(Mercersburg, PA. October 10, 2019) – Today, J. Gruber’s Hagerstown Town and Country Almanack’s new weather prognosticator, Chad Merrill, issues this Mid-Atlantic and Northeast weather outlook for the remainder of October into November. Merrill plans to issue similar weather outlooks every month to provide the latest trends for the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast.
The wet summer quickly transitioned to a dry fall across the Mid-Atlantic. The nation’s capital was 2.31 inches above-average for rainfall for meteorological summer, defined as June, July and August. Hagerstown, Md., rainfall was 1.69 inches above average for the summer. Then, a large upper level high pressure ridge became established along the East Coast after Labor Day, bringing a dry stretch of weather. Hagerstown, Md., had its second driest September on record with only 0.36 inch of rain. September rain was almost 4 inches below-average for Washington, D.C. The Northeast has seen a similar weather trend with a wet summer and dry fall. Boston saw above-average rain for each month of meteorological summer but fell short by 1.28 inches in September.

October has seen some rain so far and an early month roller coaster ride in temperatures. Following a record warm start to the month, fall quickly arrived by October 5. Washington hit a new record high for October on the second day of the month when the mercury skyrocketed to 98 degrees. Then, cooler air quickly returned and produced a hard freeze in interior New England that ended the growing season October 5. Canadian high pressure led to near average temperatures in New England so far this month as opposed to a warmer start to October for the Mid-Atlantic.
Merrill says a slight tweak in the pattern for October’s second half could lead to additional beneficial rain as well as a few cooler-than-average days. However, the month will likely end up drier-than-average and warmer-than-average for the Mid-Atlantic and near-average for temperatures in the Northeast.

As we head through November, Merrill says no large-scale pattern change is expected. Therefore, expect less-than-average rainfall and likely warmer-than-average temperatures for the Mid-Atlantic and near average temperatures for the Northeast. The first freeze is delayed in the Mid-Atlantic Region but will occur between October 26 and November 2. Merrill noted that this prediction is almost spot-on to recently-retired Almanack prognosticator, Bill O’Toole’s call for this year’s first freeze to occur on or around October 25, which was made over a year ago!

We are also entering the windy time of the year. Several cold fronts will likely push across the region driving gusty winds. Due to the recent dryness, the foliage season will be short-lived and not as brilliant, so take pictures while you can! Red flag conditions or brush fire danger will be elevated in November on windy days due to the drought that developed across the Mid-Atlantic early this fall season. Merrill also says we don’t expect any snow in the Mid-Atlantic or Northeast, thanks to the strong high pressure off the East Coast that will temper cold air intrusions.





                   
                                                               For more ALMANACK NEWS, click here