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MID-ATLANTIC WEATHER WATCH FOR JUNE

Severe STORMS (1,2,3); fair and very warm (4,5,6,7). More severe STORMS (8,9,10) turning fair and very warm again (11,12,13,14,15,16). STORMS (17,18,19) with fair and very warm weather (20,21, 22); STORMS (23,24,25) Fair and hot (26,27,28,29,30).

     

GARDENING ACTIVITIES

FOR  JUNE



A THOUGHT 
FOR TODAY'S LIVING 

Gardens are for all ages: to the young, for hope of the future; the elderly, for fond memories of the past, and for those in between, the rewards of a better life today.

TAKE A KID FISHIN'

C

ast close to the shoreline for more bites.

Always search out mossy areas around lakes and ponds.  Fish prefer to swim in these areas to forage for food.

Never fish from bridges or roadways, especially if they are marked with ‘NO FISHING’ signage.  Not only are you violating the law but you risk injury from oncoming traffic or from falling. 

Shiny fishing lures can attract certain fish, but the reflection of the sun can blind them and cause confusion. Instead, use a matted metal fishing lure if possible and you will cut down on the reflection.

CATCH-AND-RELEASE

When you go fishing, you may not want or need to keep your catch. Practicing catch-and-release is a great way to make sure there will always be fish swimming in that favorite fishing hole.  

If you aren't planning on eating your catch or mounting them on the wall, you can still take something home to remind you of the day. Taking a picture of a fish right after you've caught it will give you a nice keepsake while releasing it will survive to be caught again another day. Remember to handle the fish with care before returning it to the water.  Here are some other tips to employ when your catch-and-release:

Once you've hooked a fish, bring it in quickly so it doesn't become too tired. Leave the fish in the water or your net while removing the hook.

Wet your hands before touching the fish if you have to hold it for a picture or to remove the hook.

Be careful and quick when removing the hook. Just twist the hook while pushing it toward the bend. Use pliers or other special tools if the hook is deep in the mouth. With treble hooks, remove one barb at a time. If the fish swallowed the hook, cut the line inside of the mouth and release the fish without removing the hook. 

Return the fish to the water as quickly as possible. If it doesn't swim by itself, you might be able to revive the fish by moving it through the water headfirst to force water through its mouth and over its gills. 

If you use a livewell on a boat to store fish that you still want to release, be sure to change water frequently and keep the aerators pumping.